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Speakers

Jos Weyers – How to Lose Access to your Door in Two Easy Steps
Patryk Czeczko & Pawel Kordos – Malware Development for Advanced Adversary Emulation
Jack Baker – Lessons Bug Hunters Can Learn from Game Hackers
Chloé Messdaghi – Hacker Rights
Ken Nierenhausen – Hacking a Treat Tossing Dog Camera
Zeefeene – Anti-Lockpicking Features of High Security Locks
Patryk Czeczko & Pawel Kordos – Applied Purple Teaming
Viss – How to Vet Your Vendors
Wasabi – WMI Stole Your Cat
Joe Rozner – Attacking Espressif Based Devices


How to Lose Access to your Door in Two Easy Steps

Jos Weyers

Information leakage is not just a digital problem. Neither is your access management system. This talk will address this often overlooked opsec fail; pictures of keys can be found all over the internet, put there by proud new buildingowners, jobhoppers or correctional facility officers. These pictures can be turned into actual working keys, causing all sorts of chaos. This talk will show why this is a problem, why we should care and maybe make you rethink your physical security a bit.

Jos Weyers (@josweyers) is a world-record holder in the field of lock impressioning and a mainstay participant at LockSport events around the world. Jos is the President of TOOOL.nl, a key figure at the Hack42 hackerspace in Arnhem, and the director of hackerspacevastgoedBV. He was the mastermind behind the beehive42.org initiative. Featured in the New York Times and Quest. Voted #2 in the category “Hackers and Security” of the Nerd101-list of VrijNederland June 2015. He’s also devilishly handsome (citation needed).
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Malware Development for Advanced Adversary Emulation

Patryk Czeczko & Pawel Kordos

Advanced adversaries don’t solely rely on available C&C frameworks and offensive tools – they craft custom, unique software that evades detection and covertly penetrate infected network. To stay ahead of the game and be able to simulate actual threat actors it’s necessary to brush up on development skills while diving deep into malware TTPs.

During the talk we will demonstrate common techniques used by malicious software and leveraged by red/purple teams during adversary simulations, including: AV/EDR evasion, code injection, anti-sandbox and anti-debug techniques, polymorphic malware, dynamic API resolving, function unhooking and more…

Whether you are a red/purple teamer interested in custom tooling development or a defender who wants to understand how advanced malware operates you will surely find this topic interesting.

Patryk is the technical director in the Purple Team in a global bank, managing cooperation between offensive and defensive teams, modelling and conducting TTP-based adversary simulations. Former lead of the Red Team in a Big4 company, managed and conducted tens of red team/purple team engagements for clients (mainly PL). Speaker at x33fcon, What The Hack and The Hack Summit. Areas of expertise and interest include adversary emulation, malware development and Windows/AD internals. Personal blog: https://0xpat.github.io
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Lessons Bug Hunters Can Learn from Game Hackers

Jack Baker

Everyone knows the best hackers are video game hackers. Well, maybe that’s an exaggeration, but some of the most impressive hacks come from speedrunners, botters, and cheaters. In this talk, Jack will discuss a few of the tools and techniques game hackers have refined and explain how they can be applied by reverse engineers and bug hunters.

Jack Baker is a quote-unquote “security professional” from Sacramento. At his first LayerOne, Jack’s tamper contest entry was disqualified because it “had blood on it”.
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Hacker Rights

Chloé Messdaghi

1 out 4 of hackers don’t submit vulnerabilities due to the fear of out-of-date legislation, press coverage, and companies misdirected policies. This talk will focus on increasing public awareness in order to bring legislation that supports ethical hackers, challenge socially constructed biases, and encourage organizations to support bilateral trust within their policies… and the actions we can do to change the current landscape.

Chloé Messdaghi is a changemaker who grows tech startups, and co-founded Women of Security (WoSEC) and Hacking is NOT a Crime, and founded WeAreHackerz. She is an international keynote speaker at major information security and tech conferences and events, and serves as a trusted source for national and sector reporters and editors. Additionally, she is one of the Business Insider’s 50 Power Players of Cybersecurity, a SC Magazine honoree, Cybersecurity Advocate of the Year by WSC, and Cybersecurity Women of the Year by Cybersecurity Excellence Awards.

She holds a Master of Science (M.S.) from The University of Edinburgh, and a BA in International Relations from University of California, Davis, as well as a Certificate in Entrepreneurship from Wharton and other professional certificates.
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Hacking a Treat Tossing Dog Camera

Ken Nierenhausen

Features like night vision, two-way audio, video, dog behavior monitoring and treat tossing are appealing to many customers but are also appealing to attackers. This talk will cover the reverse engineering and exploitation of a treat tossing dog camera.

Ken is an information security consultant who works at Somerset Recon with a strong focus on embedded security. Ken enjoys working on low level hardware analysis, firmware exploitation and bootloader security.
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Anti-Lockpicking Features of High Security Locks

Zeefeene

I’ve spent the last few years trying to design a lock which is highly resistant to lockpicking. Along my journey, I’ve learnt many things about how lock manufacturers have tried to thwart lockpickers – both ingenious and fruitless – and I hope to share some of them. Join me for a whistle-stop tour of lock development, looking at all kinds of strange and exotic lock designs both new and old, as we examine some of the interesting ways lock manufacturers have tried to solve one of the most critical challenges of physical security.

Zeefeene has been an active member of The Open Organisation of Lockpickers UK for a number of years now, and is fanatical about teaching locksport, lockpicking techniques, and discussing physical security. He writes articles for the toool.uk blog, and is gainfully employed by a lock manufacturer.
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Applied Purple Teaming

Patryk Czeczko & Pawel Kordos

Purple teaming is all about working together to make a scenario-based testing a structured, ordered and repeatable exercise. This happens by engaging all relevant cyber offence and defence stakeholders, establishing a clear path from an initiative (an emerging threat) to a desired outcome (prevention and detection capabilities) and implementing this approach as an element of cyber security strategy.

During the talk we will touch purple teaming approach focusing on technical aspects of it – from an intelligence report and malware analysis, through developing and conducting TTP-based emulation to remediating gaps by hardening configuration and fine-tuning monitoring alerts.

Whichever colour you wear you will surely find the topic interesting.

Patryk is the technical director in the Purple Team in a global bank, managing cooperation between offensive and defensive teams, modelling and conducting TTP-based adversary simulations. Former lead of the Red Team in a Big4 company, managed and conducted tens of red team/purple team engagements for clients (mainly PL). Speaker at x33fcon, What The Hack and The Hack Summit. Areas of expertise and interest include adversary emulation, malware development and Windows/AD internals. Personal blog: https://0xpat.github.io
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How to Vet Your Vendors

Viss

Solarwinds got you down? Tired of chasing F5 bugs? Stuck with that on-call phone this week and dreading being the one to get the call that some new vendor you brought on leaked all your orgs secrets, or let hackers in somehow?

I know this feel. It’s not a good one. This talk will cover some techniques to get an idea of how seriously a vendor takes their own security, and will give you the ability to assert what you might be signing up for by bringing them on board. These techniques aren’t pigeonholed only to hardware vendors, but any business partner – software, business workflow, HR outsourcing, manufacturing – you name it.

The concept here is “the same people who secure the perimeter of the business are the ones who secure the internals and LAN – so if the perimeter is full of holes, you can bet the LAN is as well”.

I’ll show you how to find those holes. It’s better to be informed, because the current “vendor security assessment” dance is “send them a spreadsheet and hope they dont fill it with lies”, and that’s not good enough.

Dan Tentler is the Executive Founder of Phobos Group, a boutique information security services company, which recently released Orbital – a subscription based attack surface discovery and enumeration platform.
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WMI Stole Your Cat

Wasabi

This talk will dive into WMI/MI and what it can do for both administrators and adversaries. We will cover the history of WMI/MI, how it works, how it is used normally, and how it can be used maliciously and finally how to spot misuse. Real world scenarios will be discussed along with more theoretical capabilities of WMI/MI misuse. We will be discussing modern (last 6 months) techniques that are being seen in the wild utilizing WMI and the challenges faced by defenders to identify these techniques. Since many tools do not fully detect these WMI events it can be difficult for administrators and incident responders to clearly and easily contain WMI worms or malicious activity.

Tinkerer of electronics, networks, and sometimes does incident response.
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Attacking Espressif Based Devices

Joe Rozner

Attacking ESP Based Products provides a survey of the existing research around the espressif based chips. It walks through the differences between the various families and describes how software is built for it. With this base knowledge we can then dive into techniques and tooling used to move the problem of attacking these products from a hardware attack to software. We look at methods of extracting firmware and tooling to aid in reverse engineering.

Currently attending the DG School of How to Python so that he can learn how to be a hacker when he grows up.
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